Is it possible to install the Oracle VM Templates onto the Windows 7 VPC - PeopleSoft OVM Templates

Hey there, i have a question, i have been searching the internet to see if there is an answer, but have come up short. Is it possible to use the Windows Virtual PC feature of windows 7 to install the Oracle VM templates onto? Has anyone attempted this and been successful? I would love to hear your experiences on this. 

The OVM Templates are based on Oracle's VM Server.
You might find it interesting to try Oracle's VirtualBox
http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/server-storage/virtualbox/downloads/index.html
VirtualBox runs on Windows (tm), I've used it to Oracle Linux, but not the OVMs. 

As Greg said earlier, Peoplesoft OVM are Oracle VM based. And since Oracle VM is a bare-metal virtualization software, it does not installed on top of a host OS but rather, instead of.
To be used by an other virtualization software, you have to find a way to transform those Oracle VM based templates for your virtualization software compliance. And that might be very tedious, the templates are built on Xen, it means you should remove it first before going to your own VM. You may find some ways over Internet suggesting a move from Oracle VM (bare-metal) to VirtualBox (non bare-metal, installable on top of your host OS), however it does not look so easy to do.
Better and much easier to build a dedicated machine for that.
You may have to ask such question in the Oracle VM Server for x86 though, maybe some VM specialist can help you further.
Nicolas.

Related

Ethernet card  was not detecting...

I am using Dell Laptop, I have a inbuild NIC card. It is working fine in my Windows OS. But it was not detecting in OEL 5.5
I have a ADSL Modem and want to connect to Internet in OEL 5.5
Is it possible to use WiFi in OEL 5.5 ???
Anyway, I want to use Internet on my OEL 5.5 laptop 
I wrote a wireless howto for OEL 5.4:
Configure Wireless in OEL 5 Howto
The following link may also be interesting for you:
Re: Intel 3945 driver needs hotplug firmware 
Karumudi7 wrote:
I am using Dell Laptop, I have a inbuild NIC card. It is working fine in my Windows OS. But it was not detecting in OEL 5.5OEL is not intended to be used on laptops. It does not have many of the drivers required for laptop-type h/w that is very different from that of a server. Yes, OEL is also not intended to be used on a desktop either. It is a server operating system distro. Use it on anything else and run into driver and h/w issues? You only have yourself to blame.
I really fail to understand why there are regular postings here about OEL not working on a laptop/notebook... IT IS NOT INTENDED TO BE USED ON IT! That simple.
The correct distro for a laptop/netbook is something like Ubuntu Netbook. Recently installed 10.4LTS on an Acer Aspire and it simply worked. WiFi, video camera, mouse pad, additional USB Genuis mini-mouse, on-board sound, etc.
If you want to run Oracle on it, install Oracle XE/Express Edition. Not only will you be legal, it is the better version of Oracle when you want to learn how to use Oracle. It also can be installed (via Ubuntu's package manager) on Ubuntu distro's. APEX is bundled with. An APEX web application is provided for database management. And it works exactly the same an a Standard Edition or Enterprise Edition of Oracle (XE simply has specific limitations that limits its scalability and size). So what you learn using XE applies to bigger Oracle db versions too.
Using software is very much about using the right tools for the job. OEL for a laptop ain't it... 
Yah, previosly I too use Ubuntu Desktop Editions.
Now I am learning Oracle DBA, & so I am familiar woth OEL in my class. So i installed it on my Lappy.
No need of WiFi, atleast Ethernet port. its enough so I can access Internet tooo.
Model: Dell Latitude D530 & Dell studio 1555
Driver: Broadcom Net Link Gigabit Ethernet ( seen this in Windows Device Manager under Network Adapters). 
If you install virtualisation software like Virtualbox or VMware you can run OEL inside it, among Windows and Ubuntu if you desire. It will bridge your Wifi to a standard ethernet port inside your virtual machine and you don't need to setup Wifi inside OEL. It is possible however to setup Wifi inside OEL, without VM and use the hardware directly, but like Billy outlined, OEL like RHEL is not designed to be installed and used on desktop or mobil computing platform. 
Karumudi7 wrote:
Yah, previosly I too use Ubuntu Desktop Editions.
Now I am learning Oracle DBA, & so I am familiar woth OEL in my class. So i installed it on my Lappy.Why not install Fedora instead? It is a RedHat distro and will be very similar to OEL in most respects. And it should support laptop h/w better than OEL.
Also, what are you expecting to learn from OEL for Oracle DBA'ing purpose? I'm a dba and all my support platforms (netbook, laptop and desktop) run one or other flavour of Ubuntu/Kubuntu - and this more than suffices being able to administer OEL Oracle platforms.
Yes, IMO a dba must have a certain level of o/s competence and experience. But I do not see that being limited to a single specific Linux distro. The software and commands are standard across distros. The major differences are service and network configuration between Debian and RedHat distros. And this is more a sysadmin area than that of a dba.
And do not confuse the distro GUI with the ability to administer that server platform. If you cannot do it using command line via ssh, then you lack as a dba or sysadmin. 
For what it's worth, I'm a fan of computer political discussion. Why are there different distributions that make support certainly more complex and confusing for the novice? And what about all these different Unix command shells, how does this help?
I think the history of Unix, the implications of commercial and "freeware" intentions explain much of the above. It seems there is some strive for liberty in Linux and GNU, albeit urging people to follow standards and guidelines. In my opinion, it is very unlikely that there is ever going to be the best "Linux" or "Unix", not unless people give up personal preferences. Unfortunately, if you dig deep enough, there are always commercial interests in one way or another.
From a day to day perspective, I personally see no compelling reason yet to run Linux on my desktop, nor MS-Windows, why bother? However, or some may say unfortunately, if I'm going to use Oracle and Linux, why bother with anything else than OEL, in particular for the purpose of studying? 
So, you are preferring Ubuntu. I have Ubuntu 10.04 Desktop edition CD, can I go with this?
Are the things are same like the OEL?
Becoz there is no root in Ubuntu directly and the command is also different $su -i
What abt bash_profile?
If the things are same as in the OEL for Oracle 10g manual Database Installation, I can prefer that.
Finally, wat abt Kernel Parameters, Will the parameters are same for all Distros?
ThanX
Edited by: Karumudi7 on 23-Aug-2010 06:44 
Markus Waldorf wrote:
For what it's worth, I'm a fan of computer political discussion. Why are there different distributions that make support certainly more complex and confusing for the novice? And what about all these different Unix command shells, how does this help?That's why novices should stick to Ubuntu desktop distro IMO. :-)
There are however good reasons behind different distro flavours. The software suite and kernel drivers and kernel scheduling and so on for a netbook/notebook is different from a desktop and different from a server.
On the desktop aside for example. You are a savvy Linux/Unix user, interested in the latest technologies and code available for Linux. Fedora is an excellent candidate. If you only want a stable and robust desktop o/s, then Ubuntu desktop. If you are edge towards the kernel hacker type, wanting to build your own kernels and play and mess around, then Gentoo is a good candidate.
Each of these address different and unique requirements. The same holds true of server side distro's. If you want to build a software router, a Samba domain controller, a large 1000 node cluster, a database server etc - each of these comes with a specific set of requirements that no single distro can address.
From a day to day perspective, I personally see no compelling reason yet to run Linux on my desktop, nor MS-Windows, why bother? Well, I support a large number of Unix and Linux servers - database, clusters, web servers, servers that runs collection/polling software on networks, and even a NAT load balancer... and that I can only properly admin with a Linux desktop.
Why Kubuntu? Ubuntu workds out of the box. So I do not need to hack that to work. KDE as that has always been my preferred Window manager. :-) 
Karumudi7 wrote:
So, you are preferring Ubuntu. I have Ubuntu 10.04 Desktop edition CD, can I go with this?
Are the things are same like the OEL? Most things, yes.
Becoz there is no root in Ubuntu directly and the command is also different $su -iThere is - simply the security model is a tad different as a desktop o/s does not have a sysadmin dude, whereas a sever o/s does have.
To access root on Ubuntu, simply use:
sudo su - root
Type your password when prompted.
Or install Open SSH Server and you can ssh (from other platforms too) into your desktop - including as root. E.g.
sudo apt-get install openssh-server
What abt bash_profile?The same. Bash is bash is bash - irrespective of the distro.
If the things are same as in the OEL for Oracle 10g manual Database Installation, I can prefer that.Well, there's very little that is "special" with an Oracle s/w installation. It is a bunch of popup windows with a next and cancel button - all you need to do is read the text and change the defaults if needed. Anybody can install Oracle software. And how often do you install Oracle s/w? Definitely not every second day.
The important bit is not the installation itself - but how you administer the database.
Finally, wat abt Kernel Parameters, Will the parameters are same for all Distros?Mostly. Cannot speak for all distros, but the ones I've worked with use the sysctl command to set kernel parameters. As distros are based on a specific Open Source/GPL Linux kernel, those kernel parameters are the same. sysctl uses the config file +/etc/sysctl.conf+ - so that will also be the same across distros.
A distro does not mean something radically different. Underneath it all, it is the same source code. The differences come with what that kernel ships. What drivers are bundled? What Window manager? What versions used (stable, experimental, etc). What software packages are included.
If you are going to use Ubuntu, then I suggest installing XE. It is free. It is great for experimenting. You can create database instances. You can destroy them. You can use rman for backup and recovery. You can write your own database create scripts. You can sudo as the oracle o/s user, manage and monitor and kill processes. Etc. 
I can easily imagine that an Oracle student will be much happier installing Ubuntu on a Laptop, but will learn that Oracle 11g, beside 11g Express, will not install out of the box without further investigation. That's why I think it is better to use VMware or Virtualbox and install OEL as a guest OS for an easy installation experience. 
Markus Waldorf wrote:
I can easily imagine that an Oracle student will be much happier installing Ubuntu on a Laptop, but will learn that Oracle 11g, beside 11g Express, will not install out of the box without further investigation. That's why I think it is better to use VMware or Virtualbox and install OEL as a guest OS for an easy installation experience.There's no 11g XE available - not yet anyway.
I understand the issues around installation - and yes, a certified o/s version in a VM can be a better option. But installation in such a tiny part of the Oracle administration, I do not see any real benefit in it. The 11g installer is pretty intelligent. If kernel settings are incorrect, it dynamically creates a fix shell script for it to execute as root. It checks rpm requirements and will list missing rpm's. Etc.
I think it is by far more important to get stuck into something like how to create a database - without using DBCA. Doing that manually is an invaluable learning curve of what a control file is, how to start an instance without data files (as you would when doing a full recovery after a total system loss), what pfiles and spfiles are, how to create the data dictionary (something that you may need to touch again during an upgrade), how to set hardening parameters (locking accounts, revoking public privs from certain system packages), etc.
And that is exactly what XE on Ubuntu will provide. I regularly destroy my XE instance to test a recovering option with rman. Or hack one of Oracle's system packages to determine how things fit together. And can re-create that instance and database in less than 15 minutes running an automated shell script that creates a new instance.
Yes, this can also be done in a VM. But a VM on a notebook where resources are at a premium? I would rather run Oracle natively - and not using a proper server o/s in such a case is IMO a small price to pay as installing Oracle and setting kernel parameters are such a tiny part of dba'ing that it is not worth the issues and problems (and VM config issues such as networking) that a newcomer will run into. 
Looking at the frequent posts in this forum it seems that there will continue to be people who are trying to install OEL on their laptop, for whatever reason. Why? Probably because finding the right tool for the right task requires a pro, and time is money - I have time.
The Oracle 11g universal installer is a whole lot better than previous versions, but it is designed for Enterprise Linux, for good reasons. It will fail to install under Ubuntu, and I doubt that the feedback it provides is useful for someone who does not have Linux SA experience.
Installing Oracle 11g R2 on Ubuntu 10 Howto
I think that computer hardware, in particular RAM and harddisk, are so cheap nowadays , that I would rather stock up my old Laptop, and install VM and OEL, thinking about installing Oracle. However, I don't use Linux as my primary OS - I use MacOSX, and I wouldn't want to miss it. Too bad that Oracle does not support MacOSX beyond Oracle 10.1.
Edited by: Markus Waldorf on Aug 23, 2010 4:30 PM 
Markus Waldorf wrote:
The Oracle 11g universal installer is a whole lot better than previous versions, but it is designed for Enterprise Linux, for good reasons. It will fail to install under Ubuntu, and I doubt that the feedback it provides is useful for someone who does not have Linux SA experience. Did not mean that one should install 11g on Ubuntu. Instead you add the http://oss.oracle.com/debian/dists/unstable/non-free/binary-i386 to you apt sources, run an apt update, and then install oracle-xe (US/English) or oracle-xe-universal (International with Far East charset support). These are certified Debian distro (e.g. Ubuntu) packages from Oracle. Contains Oracle XE and ApEx.
That simple to get Oracle installed on Ubuntu. And you have a free/legal version. There is a dedicated XE support forum provided on OTN specifically for such users (that even used to have Tom Kyte of asktom.oracle.com providing support - not sure if he still does).
Being a dba is not about installing Oracle software - it is about running Oracle software. Which is why I am dismissive of a focus on the installation side. That means nothing in the bigger picture of being a dba. I'll rather see an Oracle newcomer gets his/her hands dirty with creating and running Oracle instances - than with petty installation issues, struggling with understanding whether to bridge the VM network or not, not knowing how to make an ISO image available as a virtual CD drive in a VM, etc.
I like VMs - have used VMware since the early beta days more than 10 years ago. Have built a bunch of old DOS,. Novell and Windows 3.x style networked VMs just for fun.. but VM knowledge means nothing in the real world day-to-day work of a dba. 
You are suggesting to install XE (10g) instead of 11g. Well, to be honest, I don't have experience with XE. But I read it is an entry-level, small-footprint database, which is limited in available features - sort of Oracle "light". I'm not suggesting that everybody needs a fully fledged 10g or 11g Enterprise system, but someone who is just trying to study and get hands on the Enterprise product will want to play with the real thing. Why should a modern laptop not be suitable for this task, I mean, should it not?!
To my experience, the Oracle Enterprise installation part has only started to become more or less fool-proof with the release of 10gR2. However, let us not forget that the situation is different for newcomers. In some cases, Oracle Enterprise might not even the the right product. I'm probably exaggerating here, but I can imagine that if you give the Oracle Enterprise installation guide to the Apple community, they will tell you to get lost.
I totally agree with you that being a DBA should not focus on the installation, but I'm afraid this is somewhat wishful thinking. Actually I wonder why Oracle doesn't provide installations that do not require prerequisites - it does not have to be this way. Perhaps the current strategy is more efficient for Oracle in terms of multi-vendor support. Please don't get me wrong, I'm not against multi-platform, in fact I remember the computer platform wars ever since, starting in the mid 80's. And I think it's only that systems have matured recently to be considered compatible and competitive, that people have forgotten what this was all about, but that's also a fact.
I would imagine that the trend in general will be that systems are going to be delivered as a blackbox. Plug it in, switch it on and start using it.
Edited by: Markus Waldorf on Aug 24, 2010 3:36 AM
Edited by: Markus Waldorf on Aug 24, 2010 3:38 AM

Oracle VM and HCM 9.1 assumption about Windows

Can somebody confirm for me:
1. Oracle VM cannot be used within a Host O/S. Meaning, I cannot run a Windows Box with Oracle VM installed - hosting the PeopleSoft templates.
2. If #1 is not an option, what are the possibilities of running Oracle VM on an older Intel Based Laptop.
We want to start checking out 9.1, Tools 8.50 but we wouldn't be able to use one of our servers solely for Oracle VM. We might be able to commandeer a old laptop an wipe it’s O/S for this Oracle VM product (which we obviously don't know much about).
Ideally we could run a strong laptop with Win7 as a base and then the Oracle VM on top but I don't think this is possible. Right? What about another virtural server than can run on Windows?
Any thoughts would be appreciated.
Edited by: Chris.C on 10-Nov-2009 10:10 AM 
No, installed Oracle VM on top of an OS is not an option.
You could try either VirtualBox or qemu-img tool to convert Oracle VM template to vmdk, readable by VMWare.
Please, follow the following thread :
Re: Can Oracle VM Templates work with VMware?
Nicolas. 
Given the reducing costs of hard drives, I would suggest you buy a replacement high capacity drive for your desktop or laptop, do a full Oracle VM and Oracle Linux install on that. You can load Windows as a guest OS on Oracle VM, although I'm not sure Windows 7 has been tested yet.
Either way, run your templates on the replacement drive and swap in your Windows drive when you need to.
I have 3 different hard drives that I use in my laptop. Obviously you have to be cautious about the frequency you swap drives.
You can get drive trays for desktops http://search.yahoo.com/search;_ylt=A0oGk5VD7PlKCy0A469XNyoA?p=%22removable+hard+drive+trays%22 ,
or buy/make a hard drive switch http://search.yahoo.com/search?p=hard+drive+switch
Edited by: Greg Kelly (556137) on Nov 10, 2009 2:45 PM 
Actually, I have installed HCM templates using old version of Oracle VM on the top of VMWare Server 1.0.4 and it works, however there are problems with PIA image.
I have tried to convert those images using QEMU tool and VMWare converter 4.0.1, but seems like you need to get rid of Xen kernel in order to escape kernel panic. 
IvanL wrote:
Actually, I have installed HCM templates using old version of Oracle VM on the top of VMWare Server 1.0.4 and it works, however there are problems with PIA image.Hmmm, interesting, how stable is it ? What kind of problem on PIA ?
I also tried it, but was not able to connect onto the Oracle VM guest outside the Oracle VM host on the lan.
I have tried to convert those images using QEMU tool and VMWare converter 4.0.1, but seems like you need to get rid of Xen kernel in order to escape kernel panic.In the thread I linked earlier, I gave a URL with example how to work around this, but it looks this is not a one click conversion.
I need to get time for testing.
Nicolas. 
It is stable for appbatch and DB images, however I recieve kernel panic when starting PIA image. I am currently researching this.
I have used Oracle VM Server 2.1, while current version does not work on VmWare. Seems that LAN works correctly on guests. 
IvanL wrote:
...I have used Oracle VM Server 2.1, while current version does not work on VmWare. Oh, Oracle VM Server 2.1.... intersting. I was trying within Oracle VM Server 2.2...
Am I understanding correctly : you are running Oracle Server VM 2.1 as a VM image inside VMWare, and this Oracle VM Server 2.1 run itself other images, right ?
And your Oracle VM guest (hosted by Oracle VM Server itself hosted by VMWare?) are accessible from any point (outside the Oracle VM host) on the LAN ?
Nicolas. 
Yep, all is correct 
The problem with PIA image was an error while configuring eth0 during boot. I have sorted it out by removing existing virtual network interface and creating a new one in Oracle Vm Manager 
Thank you for your feedback.
Nicolas. 
Thanks all. This is all very usefull and very interesting. Hope to get some cycles on this shortly. Thanks for the imput. Please keep us informed if anybody makes any serious progress of finds issues. I think I am going to aim for a virtualbox install on Win7 and go from there. 
Chris,
I also got it working within VMWare 2.0.2/Oracle VM Manager 2.2.0/Oracle VM Server 2.2.0.
You could have a look on my blog :
http://gasparotto.blogspot.com/2009/11/oracle-vm-template-for-peoplesoft-in.html
Nicolas.

Looking for advice reg Oracle 12c installation on Ubuntu

Hi Gurus, I need your advice regarding installation of Oracle 12c. Background: Our application uses Java Hibernate framework and its running fine on Oracle 11g.Our customer wants to use Oracle 12c  for good.I need to just confirm if my application works on Oracle 12c with existing configurations. My Problem: I am pondering different options to install Oracle 12c on my Ubuntu quickly. My network speed and bandwidth are not great, I would prefer to download as less as possible as my intention is just to check compatibility of my application. I was able to install Oracle 11gr2 on my system which took lot of effort and I do not want to disturb this installation. Following are the options I am considering. Please guide me which one is possible and better choice. (As of now I have not downloaded any software expect Oracle VM Virtual Machine for Ubuntu which is of size 90mb) 1) I have vmware installed, download image for Oracle for Linux and Oracle 12c database for Oracle for Linux . Create virtual OS for Oracle for Linux and run Oracle 12c2) Download Oracle VM Virtual Machine for Ubuntu, download image for Oracle for Linux and Oracle 12c database for Oracle for Linux . Create virtual OS for Oracle for Linux and run Oracle 12c. Installation of Oracle VM Virtual Machine for Ubuntu is giving some problems which need to be sorted out3) Download Redhat Linux image and run it from VMware. Since Oracle 12c is certified for Redhat , install on Redhat in Virtual Machine4) Install Oracle 12c on Ubuntu itself through guides available over web. My system config as follows: UbuntuRelease 12.04 Precise 64-bitKernel Linux 3.8.0-42-genericGNOME 3.4.2 Memory: 7.7 GProcessor: i5-3230M CPU # 2.6 Ghz x 4Available Disk Space: 55.GB  [ in case there is better place for the question, please direct me to the same. ]
1 Virtual box only supports AMD64 software. Your OS and consequently the database will have to be 32bits. Vmware has the same issue2 Oracle isn't certified for Ubuntu. This means Support will refuse to help you. Sybrand BakkerSenior Oracle DBA
pvvdp wrote:
 
Hi Gurus,
 
I need your advice regarding installation of Oracle 12c.
 
Background:
 
Our application uses Java Hibernate framework and its running fine on Oracle 11g.
Our customer wants to use Oracle 12c  for good.
I need to just confirm if my application works on Oracle 12c with existing configurations.
 
My Problem:
 
I am pondering different options to install Oracle 12c on my Ubuntu quickly. My network speed and bandwidth are not great, I would prefer to download as less as possible as my intention is just to check compatibility of my application. I was able to install Oracle 11gr2 on my system which took lot of effort and I do not want to disturb this installation.
 
Following are the options I am considering. Please guide me which one is possible and better choice. (As of now I have not downloaded any software expect Oracle VM Virtual Machine for Ubuntu which is of size 90mb)
 
1) I have vmware installed, download image for Oracle for Linux and Oracle 12c database for Oracle for Linux . Create virtual OS for Oracle for Linux and run Oracle 12c
Ok, it sounds like your reference to "Oracle for Linux" is actually "Oracle Linux" -- Oracle's version of the Linux OS, built off of Red Hat Linux. If that is what you mean -- create a virtual machine running Oracle Linux .. then running Oracle rdbms on that virtual machine, then you are running Oracle on a supported OS.  It doesn't really matter what the host OS is. Mind you, you'd probably be hard pressed to actually get support in the form of an SR, but it doesn't seem that is really your concern, and it doesn't seem to me, from how I'm interpreting your post, that it should be a concern.  You just want to get oracle running on an OS that will be easy to install and have a justified expectation that thing will work as documented.  
2) Download Oracle VM Virtual Machine for Ubuntu, download image for Oracle for Linux and Oracle 12c database for Oracle for Linux . Create virtual OS for Oracle for Linux and run Oracle 12c. Installation of Oracle VM Virtual Machine for Ubuntu is giving some problems which need to be sorted out
3) Download Redhat Linux image and run it from VMware. Since Oracle 12c is certified for Redhat , install on Redhat in Virtual Machine
My previous comment seems to apply equally for items #2 and #3.    
4) Install Oracle 12c on Ubuntu itself through guides available over web.
Bad idea.  My system config as follows: 
Ubuntu
Release 12.04 Precise 64-bit
Kernel Linux 3.8.0-42-generic
GNOME 3.4.2
 
Memory: 7.7 G
Processor: i5-3230M CPU # 2.6 Ghz x 4
Available Disk Space: 55.GB
 55g disk available could well be cutting things short.  If you can't free up any, you could get an external disk for a very reasonable cost and put your entire VM setup on that.  See others comments regarding CPU support for virtualization products.
When you say this, "Oracle VM Virtual Machine for Ubuntu" to what software are you actually referring? Do you mean what Oracle calls "Oracle VM for Linux" which is actually Oracle's distribution of Xen? You need to know what you are doing with Xen to get that working.If you want to set up something quickly, I would use VirtualBox. I've used it to run 64bit Linux guests (you need 64 bit for 12c) using several host operating systems: 32bit Windows Vista, 64bit Windows 8, 64bit Linux (various distributions), Solaris on Intel. Much easier than Xen.There are pre-configured guest images with the DB installed that you can download, though I have never bothered to use them. You can create your own in a couple of hours.
Our application uses Java Hibernate framework and its running fine on Oracle 11g.
What does that mean? What is the architecture that your 'application' uses? Client/middle-tier/full DB version?Our customer wants to use Oracle 12c  for good.Why?What are their business/technical reasons for wanting to use 12c?Do they currently use 12c?Do they have technical personnel that have expertise in 12c?Do they plan to use the multi-tenant features of 12c? (If you don't know what that is you have some SERIOUS research ahead of  you)I need to just confirm if my application works on Oracle 12c with existing configurations.What does 'with existing configurations' mean to you? What 'flavor' of 12c does your application need to work with? Oracle 12c can use a standard or a multi-tenant architecture and they have some significant differences. You need to test the SAME architecture for 12c that your customer plans to use.I am pondering different options to install Oracle 12c on my Ubuntu quickly.You only have ONE viable option - install a virtual manager such as VirtualBox and install an OS and 12c within that  environment. Oracle is NOT supported on Ubuntu. Yes - you might get it to work but you will likely have problems doing so and you will never know for sure whether the cause of those problems is the OS or not. See the first option on this list of 'Pre-Built Developer VMS (for Oracle VM VirtualBox)VirtualBox VMs for Developers If you take that first download link the page will show you the prerequisites:
Technical Requirements: 
Dedicate 2 cores, 5 GB memory and 30GB disk space to the virtual machine
Install will require ~40GB disk space including temporary files
That means your machine is BARELY sufficient for the task. Which means that you will likely have issues finding the disk space to do much of anything. Depending on the size of the tablespaces your app needs (or creates by default) that could mean you will have to customize the configuration or your own app just to install and configure it. Which means you likely won't be testing the SAME version/configuration of your own app that your customer will be using. Do you plan to deliver an app to a customer that is different from what you actually test?My network speed and bandwidth are not great, I would prefer to download as less as possible as my intention is just to check compatibility of my application. I was able to install Oracle 11gr2 on my system which took lot of effort and I do not want to disturb this installation.If you are concerned with even being able to download the software then you are treading on thin ice indeed. You can expect the same, or even more, issues with 12c if you install it, as-is, on unsupported Ubuntu which is why your only viable option is a VM manager. There are NO SHORTCUTS. If you value your customer you need to perform proper testing. To perform proper testing you need the proper environment and software.
Besides the replies given by other members, why it is that you want to use Ubuntu? If being free is the reasoning,Oracle's own Linux is completely free to use and definitely is certified as well. The way I am interpreting your post, it seems that you have the Ubuntu installation done for something that's in-use over a production server. Correct me if I am wrong but if I am correct, you are just doing it wrong! Instead of struggling with Ubuntu and hoping things would work out okay for it, you may want to use a certified distro of Linux. Yes, you may get oracle db running on ubuntu also but as the question of getting help for the issues about it, you won't get many of them. For 12c, read and re-read Rp's reply. It's a very new release and very different(depends on the way you are going to use it though) from the older ones. So do ensure that you need to go for it only if it's an absolute must. If it's just because, anything new , let's go for it, you are just going to open a box full of surprises .  Just my cents.Aman....
For once, Aman...,I disagree with you  12c has been GA for a year, the first patch set is out, any decent DBA has upgraded his qualifications, there are many excellent (and in some cases long overdue) enhancements. If I were a customer, I would not be pleased with consultants who advise against it. The upgrade is straightforward (though if using OWB, that is a bit of a pain) and I can see no reason not to do it.
For once, Aman...,I disagree with you That's perfectly fine John . 12c has been GA for a year, the first patch set is out, any decent DBA has upgraded his qualifications, there are many excellent (and in some cases long overdue) enhancements. If I were a customer, I would not be pleased with consultants who advise against it. The upgrade is straightforward (though if using OWB, that is a bit of a pain) and I can see no reason not to do it. Totally agreed but the important bit is that the underlying DBA must have done his/her homework well enough to brush up with what 12c is all about and how he/she can take the best use of it. My point was that just because the customer is asking to go for it, may not be a very good reason to start the process if the DBA himself hasn't tested out the outcome of this upgrade. If all the tests are done, DBA is aware about 12c and what options it has, definitely one should go for it. Sounds correct ? RegardsAman....
Moved to the Installation forum - pl post future questions in appropriate forum

Help with Peoplesoft OVM - HCM 9.1

Hi ,
I am very new to the Virtual machine world...So please bear with any of my questions which might be silly to others....
I have both working Redhat Linux and Windows 2008 server environments ... I just want to have a working Peoplesoft HCM app deployed on any of them(everything in a single machine) for demo purpose. 250 GB HDD / 8 GB RAM. Which machine (windows / unix) is recommended for this?
I have downloaded the Peoplesoft HCM templates from edelivery of oracle (DB template, Apps/Tools template) . All the steps documented in the Oracle technical paper starts from the deployment of these peoplesoft templates and it talks little about the installation of Oracle VM server / Manager. The steps of PSHCM template deployment are clear. But i dont how to start with VM Server / VM Manager in my case.
I have downloaded the iso files from edelivery for Oracle VM (manager, server 3.3 pack) . I have explored the oracle doc (http://docs.oracle.com/cd/E11081_01/doc/doc.21/e10899/ovsig.htm) for the same ..but not able to understand the process...
a) is it mandatory to have Oracle VM Server...I think it is trying to install another linux ....in my case, i have already working linux environment, why again do i need to install another linux environment on top? Cant i directly install Oracle VM manager on top of my existing Redhat Linux and deploy PSHCM templates after that?
If no (i.e Oracle VM Server needs to be installed before VM Manager), With a iso image downloaded from oracle, how to install Oracle VM server on my existing Redhat linux ? (pls give steps). How many partitions do i need to make etc?
b) Cant i use any softwares like Virtual box or VM ware to open the PS-HCM images ?
c) Once VM Server is installed, (ie. it creates a new linux Os evniroment) ....then VM Manager needs to be installed on that new linux os enviroment or my existing Redhat linux environment?
d) Once VM manager is installed, we need to deploy the PS HCM templates. I think it will create a virtual machine... how much hard disk space / RAM we need to give for the virtual disk for db template and apps template?
Please help me by giving some steps with configuration ....thanks a lot...
Regards
Prasath.C 
Prasath C wrote:
a) is it mandatory to have Oracle VM Server...I think it is trying to install another linux ....in my case, i have already working linux environment, why again do i need to install another linux environment on top? Cant i directly install Oracle VM manager on top of my existing Redhat Linux and deploy PSHCM templates after that? Oracle VM Server is not Linux: it is a bare-metal hypervisor like VMware ESX. It allows you to run virtual machines, like the PeopleSoft HCM template you downloaded. You also need another Linux box to run the Oracle VM Manager. This can be on top of an existing Red Hat or Oracle Linux server.
If no (i.e Oracle VM Server needs to be installed before VM Manager), With a iso image downloaded from oracle, how to install Oracle VM server on my existing Redhat linux ? (pls give steps). How many partitions do i need to make etc? You cannot install Oracle VM Server on top of anything else. It is a bare-metal operating system that replaces whatever is installed.
b) Cant i use any softwares like Virtual box or VM ware to open the PS-HCM images ?No. The PeopleSoft templates are designed for Oracle VM Server and do not work under VirtualBox.
c) Once VM Server is installed, (ie. it creates a new linux Os evniroment) ....then VM Manager needs to be installed on that new linux os enviroment or my existing Redhat linux environment?It is not a new Linux OS environment, it's a bare-metal hypervisor that happens to run a Linux management domain. The VM Manager needs to be installed on another Linux server running either Oracle or Red Hat linux. You need at least two machines for this.
d) Once VM manager is installed, we need to deploy the PS HCM templates. I think it will create a virtual machine... how much hard disk space / RAM we need to give for the virtual disk for db template and apps template?This is already defined by the template itself. It already has the hard disks and RAM configured. 
Hi Avi Miller,
Thanks for your replies....I have again seriously gone through some documentation and come back to your replies....Now i am able to understand what you mean...Your answers are up to the point.....it gave something for me to get started...thanks a lot...
If i understood you correctly, this is what i figured out...Please correct me if any of them are wrong..
1)Overall , i need atleast 2 physical machines. One for VM Server and another for VM Manager.
Oracle VM server needs to be installed on a bare hardware machine(say machine 1)...It replaces what ever OS if present and create a new virtualized environment to run Virtual machines.
2) Oracle VM Manager can be installed on top of an existing machine running Redhat Linux(machine 2).
3) Once VM Manager is installed, we need to create the resources / server pool by detecting the VM server present on machine 1. That gives the VM manager a option of communicating it to VM server and deploy the VM templates.
4) In my case, i need to create 2 Virtual machines and deploy them on to VM Server.
In my case i have 2 machines one running windows server2008 and one running redhat linux.... Both are from Amazon cloud....
I can use the machine running redhat linux to install oracle vm manager...But is it possible to install Oracle VM Server on Windows server 2008..(i am fine with it replacing the host windows OS and creates a virtualized environment.....)..If its a physical machine, then we can boot from CD and install VM Server..But in this case of cloud OS, i am not sure how to install VM Server at the time of booting...Is there any kind of installer (when on windows), which creates some config file and runs those configuration at the time of bootup. Though this forum is not the place to ask this question, please reply if you have any thoughts on the same... 
I think that you should move this discussion, or at least the OVM-related questions to the Oracle VM Forum. Oracle VM Server for x86 There are some really useful questions already there that you should look through. It is a really active Forum and the OVM folks do a great job at responding to as many questions as possible.
Having said all that I don't think that you're going to be able to set up Oracle VM using your current resources, cloud based machines, Windows 2008 etc. You should think of OVM Server as being the OS and not being installed into an OS. You should have a physical machine to install it onto. You can't use a cloud based server because there is a clear chicken and egg problem. You can't reach your cloud based machine because there would be no OS to connect to. It doesn't exist at the time of installation. You know what I mean? Well, that's not exactly true because I guess you could PXE boot the installation from the ISO but I'd imagine that isn't an option for you.... but I digress.
Avi's answers are right on the money. There is one additional detail that I would to add concerning VirtualBox. There is a Red Paper available that helps understand the inner-workings of the PeopleSoft VM templates. Within that document there are some tips for running the PeopleSoft VM templates onVirtualBox. It is kinda kludgey and the steps have not been verified by Oracle but it is worth a try if you really can't get an Oracle VM environment going. http://docs.oracle.com/cd/E27263_01/psft/html/docset.html
mj 
Prasath C wrote:
But is it possible to install Oracle VM Server on Windows server 2008..No. And you can't install this on Amazon's EC2 Cloud either, as that's already running the same virtualization software as Oracle VM. You can't put Oracle VM on top of any other virtualization solution. 
Thanks Mark....Your answers are excellent......It gave me a strong understanding of the VM environment.... thanks once again for all the references and links. 
Thank you AviMiller for your time in responding to the basic questions....It really helped. 
This is an old thread, and even though some take offense at updating old threads, I'm going to post an update because this thread shows up in the Google top 10 when searching for PeopleSoft OVM VirtualBox.
For those interested in running the PeopleSoft VM's in VirtualBox, I posted a step-by-step article on creating a VirtualBox DB image from a PeopleSoft OVM DB image: http://jjmpsj.blogspot.com/2012/05/converting-peoplesoft-ovm-templates-to.html.

Unable to reduce brightness on Toshiba Satellite model with OL6

1. Unable to reduce the brightness on my Toshiba laptop which is dual loaded with Windows 7 and Oracle Linux 6.
Edited the /sys/class/brightness/acpi_video0/brightness by sending echo n, but it did not work.
The Power Management preferences are not working although I am able to reduce the brightness meter, but not the actual brightness.
2. The Wi-Fi is not working, even after configuring the eth0 with wireless configuration. Any special driver needs to be installed?
Please assist. 
Would you blame Microsoft if power management and Wifi did not work under Windows, or would you rather consider to contact the computer vendor?
I have not seen any information that mentions that Oracle Linux was focusing on support for desktop and mobile computer systems. Instead, Oracle Linux and the Oracle UEK kernel are optimized for enterprise server installations and supporting Oracle products.
Unless the vendor of your computer system provides RHEL or Oracle Linux support, your experience running Enterprise Linux will vary and depend on built-in hardware compatibility with the mainstream Linux kernel. You will certainly have more luck choosing a Linux distribution that is generally build to support desktop and mobile computing needs, such as Linux Ubuntu or Red Hat Fedora.
Alternatively, you can search the Web for open source support of your hardware components and build the drivers you need from source code. It might also be worth checking other communities, e.g. http://elrepo.org/tiki/tiki-index.php and http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/EPEL for support of your hardware. To run Oracle Linux on unsupported hardware I would generally recommend to look into VirtualBox at http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/community/developer-vm/index.html. The advantages of virtualization are too great to be ignored. 
You might want to reconsider the dual-boot configuration. You would be far better off to install VirtualBox and boot OEL in a virtual image w/o any driver concern... 
Thanks for the response.
Of course, I am aware of the OEL's optimization and its real capabilities.
The Power Management, Wi-Fi are working fine on MS Windows 7, and I may be the drivers provided by my laptop vendor are not compatible for Oracle Linux 6.
I personally compared various versions of Linux and decided to have OEL after trying it out on VirtualBox (on which everything worked fine as the base is MS Windows). I will check the web for open source support for my hardware components.
However, I just wanted to know if any tweaks of file edits have to made in OEL in order to make those work (brightness, Wi-Fi) because I will be installing Oracle DB on it and that the concerns are important for me to rather ignore. 
Yes, before finalizing dual boot configuration, I tried out OEL to the max on VirtualBox and it was totally fine. Hence, I wanted to have a dual boot and got stuck with some issues that can't be ignored.
Thank you. 
Models in the Toshiba Satellite family vary greatly: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toshiba_Satellite. The model as such seems to be known for lack Linux support. I would not bet that anybody can provide a solution to fix your computer's hardware issues without knowing technical hardware details.
You may not really appreciate my answer(s), but anyway, I'm afraid your best option will be to post your question in a Toshiba related forum: http://forums.computers.toshiba-europe.com/forums/category.jspa?categoryID=62 
Thank you for the response.
I do appreciate the reply. Looks like, I need to open a new thread in those linux forums to get some help.

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