vmware with sles 9 and oracle kit - Desktop Datacenter(Archived)

Hello!
I've just installed sles 9 on vmware for some tests.
Then, I've found the oracle kit on vmware, so i downloaded it.
Anyone can tell me if is possible to "fit" in any way the oracle kit to my sles installation?
I'm thinking also to set up the oracle kit, then upgrade sles 8.3 to sles 9, but in this way I miss all the settings already done in my virtual machine, and this is a long job... Another way is surely more desiderable!
Thanks a lot
Paolino 

Funny you should ask...
You might know this already, however VMware doesn't officially support sles9 in WS4.5, and when you install the entire Oracle product stack some problems arise..
In the past few weeks Oracle, VMware and Novell have closely worked to resolve these issues. If all goes as planned then the SLES9 10.1.0.3 RAC VM will be available for download for Linux World Boston in Feb.
Any other route like you said, is time consuming, and you end up with something custom made, i.e. will be hard to share knowledge with others and get quick support.
Saar.

Related

Oracle installation on Fedora 11

Hi!
I've looked for installation guide, but found instructions for Fedora 4 only.
Link: [http://dbapool.com/articles/091105.html]
but due to upgrade not all of the repositories are available. Searching for RPM I've found some of them for Fedora 4, may be up to version 7 only and at least 2 of them are not being installed and give errors.
I'm new with Linux and just donno where to look for proper packages for Fedora 11.
Can someone assist or give such guide here?
Thanks! 
www.oracle-base.com
Look for articles. You'll get much closer.
I'm getting tired of warning people about the folly of using an unsupported version. 
www.oracle-base.com
Look for articles. You'll get much closer.
I'm getting tired of warning people about the folly of using an unsupported version. 
Hi userİ
I agree Hans, why you prefer to install oracle on unsupported platform? Use OEL, its free
Regard
Helios 
Firstly, if you are newbie and if you don't have specific reason to install Oracle SW on Fedora (let's say you are using Fedora on your local machine and you don't have much hardware resources to use Virtual Machine etc.), then take the advice from Hans.
And if you change your mind then you can download Oracle Enterprise Linux (a.k.a OEL) from http://edelivery.oracle.com/linux for free (as Helios posted).
If you still have specific reason to do that then at least don't put such machine/installation to production.
Fedora 11 repositories you can find here: http://download.fedoraproject.org/pub/fedora/linux/releases/11/Everything/
Execute "uname -i" command from shell to find your OS architecture to choose correct directory for download.
If you have your computer connected to internet, there is easier way how to install packages directly (for current version and correct architecture). In this case use "yum install <package name>" from command line (i.e. yum install glibc-devel).
Note Fedora 4 has different versions of packages than Fedora 11, so follow the package names mentioned in article but don't follow the versions of those packages. 
"using an unsupported version"
I've got 2 reasons to use modern version of Fedora (Red Hat) rather an obsolete purchased by Oracle Red Hat.
1. No distribution exept Fedora 11 didn't recognize a built-in netwirk card on my mainboard
2. It takes to Fedora 11 less then half a minute to load rather 3 minutes for Unbreakable Linux.
Oracle team should understand users' needs and make an installation guide for modern Linux versions.
Thanks for your reply. 
user10148197 wrote:
"using an unsupported version"
I've got 2 reasons to use modern version of Fedora (Red Hat) rather an obsolete purchased by Oracle Red Hat.
1. No distribution exept Fedora 11 didn't recognize a built-in netwirk card on my mainboardValid.
2. It takes to Fedora 11 less then half a minute to load rather 3 minutes for Unbreakable Linux.Do you really reload your system that often?
>
Oracle team should understand users' needs and make an installation guide for modern Linux versions.Oracle understands corporate user's needs - stability over convenience.
Red Hat understands that as well. That is why they have a commercial version (Enterprise Server). Even though they encourage the use of public beta of new ideas/features (Fedora) to get the majority of bugs fixed before they stick the features into the enterprise / production version.
Thanks for your reply.I thank you for taking the time to provide the info. 
"Do you really reload your system that often?"
I learn Oracle DBA, so I've installed it at home. Everyone but I use Win XP, so obviously I reload it everyday.
"Oracle understands corporate user's needs - stability over convenience. "
There are plenty of users' "own" guides to install Oracle on earlier Fedora versions. Who know better then the team what packages to use to install? I don't think it'll take so much time. 
user10148197 wrote:
"Do you really reload your system that often?"
I learn Oracle DBA, so I've installed it at home. Everyone but I use Win XP, so obviously I reload it everyday.Fair enough This is for playing.
And I assume you feel that VM on XP is not an option - a configuration I use regularly. Since the environment does not need to be fast or stable. (Free and not necessarily huge load ... get a VMWare Server or Workstation trial, build the VM, run it using VMWare Player to lighten the footprint. Suspend rather than reboot to get performance.)
"Oracle understands corporate user's needs - stability over convenience. "
There are plenty of users' "own" guides to install Oracle on earlier Fedora versions. Who know better then the team what packages to use to install? I don't think it'll take so much time.Yes. And there are plenty of people who actually understood the OS back then. So they would dig in and fix things while learning. For those people today, I say "go for it"
These days, may people assume Linux is going to provide them exactly what is needed to run their applications. When a problem occurs due to a mis-configuration many are not able to handle it. For those people, going out on a limb and using an uncertified and unsupported configuration will only lead to long term frustration.
.
So if you are in the category of understanding Fedora 99 well enough to look under the covers and handle the kernel-Oracle API mismatch yourself, go for it. 
hi
OEL is free i know that.but it wont give you the kernel updates whereas fedora and cenOS or OpenSUSE will give.
i think so.
regards 
you wrote:
hi
OEL is free i know that.but it wont give you the kernel updates whereas fedora and cenOS or OpenSUSE will give.
i think so.
regardsOne question that you need to ask yourself - Which is more important: Oracle DB stability or free Kernel updates?
If you are only evaluating, then why do you care about the kernel updates? If you are not evaluating, then is the $100/year for access to those updates really that much of a consideration? (And honestly, how many people really do apply those kernel updates?)
Besides which, since they are binary compatible ... it is possible to get those updates from the CentOS project if absolutely needed. That is just as unsupported as a pure CentOS config. But you know you started with a valid config because you had access to the oracle-validated RPM.
Not saying one is right, the other wrong. Just raising a different point of view. 
hi
besides this OEL 5.4 is using o(1) scheduler.But current one is CFS.where as fedora 12 may be we can get the CFS.do not you think its a good new update/modification?
i hope this may not hamper the stability of ora db.
just reasoning why we need those updates.
regards 
you wrote:
hi
besides this OEL 5.4 is using o(1) scheduler.But current one is CFS.where as fedora 12 may be we can get the CFS.do not you think its a good new update/modification?
i hope this may not hamper the stability of ora db.
just reasoning why we need those updates.Oracle database is known to be stable on RH 5u4. Oracle has not mentioned even testing on anything newer at this time.
Use Fedora 12 at your own risk. It's got bells, whistles ... and pitfalls.
But do me a favour - keep us informed of how it works for you, if you decide to go for it. I'm sure Oracle's dev team peeks in over here every once-in-a-while, and if you can make their job easier by finding the issues, we'll all appreciate it. 
I have been a student of Oracle for two years now. In this time i have tested alot of OS.
My conclusion is that Fedora and CentOS has worked as good as Red Hat Enterprise, when it comes to installation, and stability. I know i dont have any production databases at home with alot of transaction, but ive had running RAC's and DataGuards on them that have been stable.
The OS except Redhat that i find most suitable for Oracle is CentOS.
Of course its dumb to use CentOS or Fedora in a "real" database... 
Pie-Man wrote:
I have been a student of Oracle for two years now. In this time i have tested alot of OS.
My conclusion is that Fedora and CentOS has worked as good as Red Hat Enterprise, when it comes to installation, and stability. I know i dont have any production databases at home with alot of transaction, but ive had running RAC's and DataGuards on them that have been stable. Which Fedora(s)? There have been at least 12 of them so far. Recognizing that the latest (the one OP is proposing) has significant kernel evolution.
Are you implying that, with all the installs and configurations you have, that you really do keep those various systems under Oracle current with the latest OS patches?
I have used Fedora with Oracle, and for ORacle installs I go back to Red Hat 9 - both boxed and downloaded. That last is where my frustration comes in ... the community swapped out the glibc and the downloaded version no longer installed Oracle8i cleanly with the new glibc. (ANd the old glibc rpm was nowhere to be found, except in the boxed version.) I have repeatedly seen similar things since then; my favorite being OpenMotif 2.2 dropping some of the API that OpenMotif 2.1 had (in other words, not backward compatible), causing the OUI to croak.
The issue that I'm trying to raise in my soap box is that people who ask for help here usually do not have enough basic Linux skills to compensate for the challenges required. They grab the latest Fedora (simply because it's the latest) and then point finger at Oracle for not keeping up with the complete set of Fedora/Ubuntu/Mandrake/OpenSUSE/MacOS-X/Solaris/Windows/HP-UX release cycles.
When the person calls for help here and doers not have an idea where to get the correct OpenMotif RPM (and when it can be proven that the correct one is on the downloaded DVD image) I wonder whether using the latest and greatest is a good idea for them.
If the person does NOT have the skills, and is looking at Linux because they need to hand in assignments over the next several months, then they need to consider whether the potential instability or headache during install is worth the risk.
OTOH, if a person truly has the skills (and time), then I encourage them to play with the combination they enjoy. And post about the experience.
>
The OS except Redhat that i find most suitable for Oracle is CentOS. Curious that you would not even mention Oracle Enterprise Linux.
>
Of course its dumb to use CentOS or Fedora in a "real" database...Then the question becomes - if there is a choice (ack'ing that hardware & drivers may limit the choice) why go to something not certified? Why not stick to the distros most likely to be seen in a production environment?

Installation hangs for 9.2.04 x86-64 on SUSE 10.1

Hi All,
Oracle 9.2.0.4 x84-64 installer hangs while I am trying to install on SUSE 10.1.
It hangs at 17% while copying naeet.o !
I had come across a similar problem at one of the forums, and the suggestion was to export the variable LD_ASSUME_KERNEL=2.4.21.
I tried adding this to /etc/profile.d/oracle.sh, and also in the .bash_profile for oracle id. I also exported ORACLE_BASE, ORACLE_HOME, LD_LIBRARY_PATH etc, still no luck.
Can someone tell me if I have missed out something? Any help would be highly appreciated.
Thanks in advance,
AM 
No personal experience on this combination, but I'd almost bet you are running into a mix between 32-bit and 64-bit issues ... for example, using libaio for 32-bit.
You might find the Novell/SuSE Oracle list useful. A specific note about 9i on 64 bit is at http://lists.suse.com/archive/suse-oracle/2005-Aug/0054.html
However, I gotta ask ... why not 10g? 
Thanks Forbrich for responding.
First, to answer ... why not 10g: I was looking at learning some of the DBA features in 9i.
In the link you provided, they talk about a preinstall patch p3423540_9204_LINUX64.zip for AMD64. I tried searching the net for it, but could not find it. Would you know a place where I could get it?
I have tried out exporting LD_ASSUME_KERNEL=2.4.20 since I am running SLES10.1
Also I downloaded orarun-1.9-14.x86_64 and it ran successfully saying my environment was correct.
I could find very limited help on the net for 9i on SLES10.
Wondering if anyone else had any luck.
Thanks again,
AM 
Thoughts for your decision:
1) SuSE 10 and 10.1 were created after Oracle created Oracle9i.
Oracle traditionally does not recompile older versions to use the libraries associated with newer OSs. There are often associated 'issues' such as the ones you are facing. The generic response is 'YOYO' (you're on your own) when going into uncharted territory.
2) Oracle 10g is backward compatible to Oracle9i.
Since this is to be a learning environment, using 10g provides all the same capabilities ... and more. In addition, the new Enterprise Manager can make administration easier ('cause it's point and click and has visual tutorials.)
Even the deprecated features, such as Rule Based Optimizer, are still usable. However, you can force the system to avoid 10g features and capabilities by setting the 'compatibile' parametr back to 9i, or even 8i.
By analogy ... you have a 5 year old 357 V8 engine. You want to put it into your 1977 Dodge Duster. The motor mounts don't match. The transmission doesn't mate.
Someone is offering you a brand new 454 Hemi engine for free - you just have to pick it up. The Dodge has already been outfitted with the correct motor mounts and tranny.
Can you make it work? ... yes!
Should you make it work? ... ... ???
Personal recommendation - don't fight with an unsupported and tricky configuration. Go for 10gR2. 
Considering the frustration I am going through to get this work, and not to mention the amount of time it is consuming... I should buy your thought!
So 10gR2 is certified on SLES 10.1?
Thanks again for your help and time.
AM
PS: By the way, nice analogy :) 
I suspect you are mixing and matching things ...
1) Oracle does not certify the 'user community' distributions, such as Fedora or SuSE Linux;
2) Oracle only certifies the versions of Linux that come with professional support agreements, such as SLES, Red Hat Enterprise and Asianux;
The above items are based on Oracle's requirement to have dedicated, on demand, support contacts and committment for an Oracle environment. In a crisis, they can call the support group and keep them online for days until the problem is resolved. This part of their committment to ensure an outage at a paid-for-support site can and will get 24x7 assistance until resolved.
3) SLES 10 has just been released. There is no SLES 10.1 (yet);
4) There is a SuSE Linux 10.0 and 10.1 ... neither is SuSE Linux Enterprise Server (SLES) [item 2], both are community-supported [item 1];
5) Oracle's certification for [western] Linux 64-bit is roughly:
- nothing for Oracle9i
- Oracle 10g Release 1 on RedHat EL 3&4, SLES 8&9
- Oracle 10g Release 2 on RedHat EL 3&4, SLES 9
However, a number of people (including myself) have successfully installed Oracle Database 10g and 10gR2 on SuSE Linux 10 and 10.1 and I know of people who claim success with the 64-bit version. Also, Werner Puschitz' site at http://www.puschitz.com/ is very helpful...
/Hans

Is it Ok to intall 11g Enterprise edtion on Fedora 7?

Hi,
I just moved to this 'Linux direction', and I installed Fedora 7 on my laptop, and now I want to install 11g Enterpirse editon on it, is it Ok?
Peter 
Yes you can, but since this is not a certified platform, you should perform some adjustments according to this guide: Install DB11gR1 on Fedora 7
~ Madrid 
You can find a 10g on Fedora 7 article here:
http://www.dizwell.com/prod/node/818
You can find a variety of 11g on all sorts of Linuxes articles here:
http://www.dizwell.com/prod/node/695#installation
Personal recommendation for anyone not wanting to do Oracle on Enterprise class linux distros (ie, Red Hat or Suse): wait one day and then do 11g on Ubuntu 7.10. The article to do that is going to be available very soon, and it's a one-download, one-click affair (nearly) 
And as promised, it (that is, the article on Ubuntu 7.10 and Oracle 11g) is now available for reading:
http://www.dizwell.com/prod/node/1046 
Thank you 
Hi all,
Thanks, I will try when I got a copy of 11g first, very slow to download here .
Peter
Hi , by the way, if we use a Fedora 7 and installed 11g for production, is it Ok, will thay system rubost?
Peter 
No.
You mentioned doing this "for production"... well, if you don't mind "unsupported production", you can install Oracle on just about anything, including FreeBSD, Mandriva, Debian Etch and much else besides. Completely off-the-planet installations, in as much as Oracle won't touch you with a bargepole if/when you run into trouble.
For supported production, it has got to be Red Hat Enterprise Server, Suse Enterprise Server or the Asianux equivalent.
But even if you said to me 'support is not required, so long as it's robust', Fedora would be one of the last distros I'd use for "robust" deployments of Oracle. By design, Fedora is a highly experimental, cutting edge distro that seeks to incorporate the latest technologies as early as possible. Red Hat use Fedora as a sort of Beta version for what will be in the next release of their Enterprise Server product... so if you deploy on Fedora, you're really deploying on a beta product. That is not the definition of "robust"!
If you want a cheap, truly robust distro to install on, Oracle's own Enterprise Linux is a clone of Red Hat, but only costs (I think) US$99 per year. Being a binary clone of Red Hat, it's as robust as you can get.
If you want a completely free, truly robust distro to install on, Centos is a binary clone of Red Hat too, and costs nothing at all -but obviously, support is on the basis of public forums and community spirit.
If you want a completely odd-ball distro which offers stability and long-term prospects and which is also completely free of charge, I'd look at Ubuntu 6.06 LTE ("Long Term Edition") which will be supported (by the Ubuntu people, not by Oracle -this is completely whacky stuff as far as Oracle is concerned, remember!) for the next 5 years, if I recall correctly. I call that the odd-ball solution not because there's anything wrong with Ubunut but because installing Oracle onto a Debian-based distro as opposed to an RPM-based one is fraught with issues. It does work (at least, the simple stuff does... I certainly wouldn't want to try RAC on it!) and works well, but it's an alien implementation, so it's very much 'being brave" territory -but, for exactly that reason, it's fun too!
But seriously: Enterprise Linux if you can pay a little or Centos if you want completely free. As robust as they get. 
Fedora is not a supported platform, and not supported means If you are able to setup your environment, you can use it for your own learning and testing, but Never for productions environments. Unsupported means you can go as far as you can with it, but if somethings goes wrong or doesn't work as expected you will be completely on your own.
For a list of supported certified production environments refer to the Oracle Certify Matrix.
~ Madrid

Downloading Oracle Standard 10g : Linux, Windows Vista, or OSX Leopard

Hi All,
So I'm new to Oracle with some experience with SQL and MySQL. I'm taking an intro class to Oracle DB and need to get 10g installed on one of my three computers ASAP (by Sunday at the latest as class started a week ago).
I first tried to install on my HP G50 with Dual Core Pentium - my preferred computer. The problem is it's running Windows Vista Home Premium (32 bit), which is not supported by 10g (as far as I can tell). Only Vista Business and Ultimate seem to be supported. Given this is my preferred computer, I have considered buying Windows XP (but I will surely miss Vista's wonderful ability to search all files with one search field). I have also considered upgrading to Business or Ultimate. But if I'm going to shell out $100 - 200 for a new OS, Oracle better download with amazing ease and purrr like a kitten.
Next I considered my iBook G4, but it appears my current version of OS X Leopard 10.5.2 is not supported by 10g either. I do have the OS X discs that originally came with the computer. They have Mac OS version 10.3.7 written on them (3 discs) and there's a 4th disc that has the following written on it: Mac OS X Tiger, Includes Xcode 2, Upgrade DVD, Version 10.4. Do you know if this is the same as OS X 10.5.4, or is this wishful thinking on my part, since I know that 10.5.4 is supported by 10g ?
My other option is to pull out my old eMachines T3092 Desktop with AMD Athlon XP 3000+ Processor. It used has Windows XP Home Edition on it, but now it crashes regularly and so I haven't used it for about 6 months. My friend thinks it would be good for me to wipe it and put Linux on it. He thinks it would be a great server to support Oracle, and it would be a good for me to have experience with Linux since I want to become a professional DBA.
Please tell me which route you would take and why. I want to spend as little time on getting 10g running as possible.
Thanks,
Ryan
Edited by: user9027948 on Jan 25, 2010 10:28 PM 
Hi,
Welcome to oracle forums.
I Personally suggest you to use "T3092 Desktop with AMD Athlon XP 3000+ Process" for learing oracle.
You can download oracle enterprise linux (OEL) from http://edelivery.oracle.com
You can also configure your HP G50 with Dual Core Pentium, make this computer as dual boot you can have both OS on single machine.
Hope helps.
Regards,
X A H E E R 
Have you considered Virtual Machines? Slower, but workable. 
I have not heard of Virtual Machines. What are they and where can I read more about them. What is the install and setup process like: long and grueling? 
I admit I like the Linux idea on either of my machines. I fear it will take a really long time to setup: like 5-10 hours.
I would appreciate every little detail of knowledge you might have about getting Linux installed and getting Oracle 10g running on it. Also, links to websites where a lot of this information is already posted would help too.
What version of Linux do you recommend for the eMachines? Is it easy enough to access my new Linux Server (on eMachines) from my laptop? Will it noticeably slow down my HPG50 if I install 2 operating systems.
What is OEL? Does it work with 10g? Is it free or inexpensive?
Thanks for everything! 
sonaeternal wrote:
I admit I like the Linux idea on either of my machines. I fear it will take a really long time to setup: like 5-10 hours.
I would appreciate every little detail of knowledge you might have about getting Linux installed and getting Oracle 10g running on it. Also, links to websites where a lot of this information is already posted would help too.
What version of Linux do you recommend for the eMachines? Is it easy enough to access my new Linux Server (on eMachines) from my laptop? Will it noticeably slow down my HPG50 if I install 2 operating systems.
What is OEL? Does it work with 10g? Is it free or inexpensive?
Thanks for everything!You can get VMware Player free from VMware. That will allow you to create virtual machines on your preferred computer.
OEL is Oracle Enterprise Linux, which is re-branded Red Hat. You can get it free from Oracle. There is even a support forum for it on this very site.
I have Oracle EE 10.2.0.4 running on OEL 4 and OEL 5 as virtual machines on my Windows XP laptop,
Note that Oracle does not support their products running on VMware, but it seems to work fine and for a student, self-study installation, the above combination provides a quick and inexpensive way to built your own private computer lab. 
EdStevens wrote:
Note that Oracle does not support their products running on VMware, but it seems to work fine and for a student, self-study installation, the above combination provides a quick and inexpensive way to built your own private computer lab.For studies, the config is usually OK - I use it in my classrooms a lot.
However, I have experienced many many issues due to clock drift. Any interaction with Grid Control or any RAC environment based on VMWare on XP falls flat on it's face at some point in the week due to clock de-sync. Sometimes cron-ing ntpd will correct that, sometimes not. 
Hans Forbrich wrote:
EdStevens wrote:
Note that Oracle does not support their products running on VMware, but it seems to work fine and for a student, self-study installation, the above combination provides a quick and inexpensive way to built your own private computer lab.For studies, the config is usually OK - I use it in my classrooms a lot.
However, I have experienced many many issues due to clock drift. Any interaction with Grid Control or any RAC environment based on VMWare on XP falls flat on it's face at some point in the week due to clock de-sync. Sometimes cron-ing ntpd will correct that, sometimes not.Point taken. I anticipate bumping into that in the not too distant future, as I am trying to use my 'private virtual lab' to play with GC and DataGuard. Be watching for a 'please help' post from me on the subject! ;-) 
Thanks to all three of you for the suggestions.
Here is where I'm at:
I'm meeting with a buddy tonight to install SUSE Enterprise edition on my AMD Desktop machine. We started out by installing Ubuntu last night, then found out it doesn't support 10g. SUSE is free for 60 days which will at least allow me to complete my Oracle Class.
Oh, please let me know where to download the libaio package to allow Oracle 10g to run on SUSE.
Hopefully this works! 
I'm also considering getting my HP Laptop setup for running 10g.
Given the problems that may occur from running OEL on VMware... what are my alternatives?
Should I run OEL without VMware as an entirely separate OS on my core duo processor laptop? How?
If I ran OEL, which 10g version should I download from this link? OEL is not listed.
http://www.oracle.com/technology/software/products/database/index.html
Back to my desktop:
Should I be installing OEL instead of SUSE, becuase OEL is free?
Edited by: sonaeternal on Jan 28, 2010 4:08 PM 
sonaeternal wrote:
Thanks to all three of you for the suggestions.
Here is where I'm at:
I'm meeting with a buddy tonight to install SUSE Enterprise edition on my AMD Desktop machine. We started out by installing Ubuntu last night, then found out it doesn't support 10g. SUSE is free for 60 days which will at least allow me to complete my Oracle Class.
Oh, please let me know where to download the libaio package to allow Oracle 10g to run on SUSE.
Hopefully this works!If it is not on the distribution disk (and you would be surprised what is there, even if not listed in the package tool), and there is no YUM server (as is the case with OEL), the first place I turn is http://oss.oracle.com
My next favorite spot is http://www.rpmfind.net/ ... just type the name of the package into the search box. 
sonaeternal wrote:
I'm also considering getting my HP Laptop setup for running 10g.
Given the problems that may occur from running OEL on VMware... what are my alternatives?The discussion between Hans and I notwithstanding, I really don't think you'll have any problems running OEL under VMware Player. Oracle won't support it, so it shouldn't be used for a production system. You won't be needing any clustered arrangements so the clock drift shouldn't be an issue. For a basic oracle class, I'd think you'd be just fine. I've been running it since November and have not had an issue with it.
>
Should I run OEL without VMware as an entirely separate OS on my core duo processor laptop? How?
If I ran OEL, which 10g version should I download from this link? OEL is not listed.
http://www.oracle.com/technology/software/products/database/index.html
Back to my desktop:
Should I be installing OEL instead of SUSE, becuase OEL is free?
Edited by: sonaeternal on Jan 28, 2010 4:08 PM 
EdStevens wrote:
sonaeternal wrote:
I'm also considering getting my HP Laptop setup for running 10g.
Given the problems that may occur from running OEL on VMware... what are my alternatives?The discussion between Hans and I notwithstanding, I really don't think you'll have any problems running OEL under VMware Player. Oracle won't support it, so it shouldn't be used for a production system. You won't be needing any clustered arrangements so the clock drift shouldn't be an issue. For a basic oracle class, I'd think you'd be just fine. I've been running it since November and have not had an issue with it.I concur.
>>
Should I run OEL without VMware as an entirely separate OS on my core duo processor laptop? How?How? is very well described by any number of articles, demos, and documents available through a simple internet search - as well as on the VMWare web site.

Oracle 9i On Win 7-64bit

Hello, In my last company i was using oracle 9i on windows 7-64 bit OS environment (just 3-month back). But now i am facing this problem "jrew.exe has stopped working". And everybody is saying its not supported to this environment but when how it was working on my last experience. I want to install this db in any case and it will use for very basic requirements.Please guide me
ir*720221*d7 wrote:
 
Hello, In my last company i was using oracle 9i on windows 7-64 bit OS environment (just 3-month back). But now i am facing this problem "jrew.exe has stopped working". And everybody is saying its not supported to this environment but when how it was working on my last experience. I want to install this db in any case and it will use for very basic requirements.Please guide me
9i is long gone and was definitely not certified on Windows 7. But that doesn't mean that it won't get installed and that's what happened with you in your last company. But now, when it's not working, you won't be able to find any solution for the reason that is told to you already-9i was never certified and supported on Win 7. It's 2015, you should at least be on 11.2 if not 12.1. What it is that you are doing which won't work on 11.2 and must need 9i only? You do know that even 11.2 can be made to run as 9i , don't you ? HTHAman....
>> And everybody is saying its not supported Stop being stubborn and start believing everybody 
From a technical perspective, 9i can work under Windows 7, however the Oracle installer was designed for much older systems and will most likely fail about system prerequisites and requirements. You are also going to be in waters where knowledge or experience is going to be very sparse. What I'd rather suggest is to look into virtualization. Virtualization is the recommended way to run desupported products and is a common solution to separate systems and to leverage the full power of today's hardware. If this is about testing or development  or not mission critical, you might want to check if your hardware supports a type 2 (vt-x/amd-v) hardware assisted virtualization product, such as VirtualBox or VMware and install a 64-bit OS that your Oracle 9i installation supports. Otherwise, for supported enterprise solutions, check the bare metal type 1 hypervisors, such as MS Hyper-V, ESXi or free Oracle VM server for x86.
Geert Gruwez wrote:
 
>> And everybody is saying its not supported
Stop being stubborn and start believing everybody
May be OP is  walking the other side of the sidewalk and saying to himself," walk alone and believe none cos may be all are using that Linux and not the Windows " .  RegardsAman....
I know its too old but i need it somewhere. And my systems specs are very low(only 4gb ram) cant run VM env. Please suggest how can i install 9i on win7. Hopes you will support and share any solution.
Maybe it's time to spend that $50 on ebay to get a better system than that . I'm surprised your system even runs win7. Anyway, no version of 9i is supported to run on any version of Windows 7. I think the latest supported version is XP. If you google the topic, you do not find a success story. So asking the community may be your only option, but unless someone has done it and happens to read your post, don't expect too much. Searching the forum was another option and here is an old post that at least shows some instructions at the very end. I'm afraid that might be the best you can get. Installation of Oracle 9i on Windows 7
what you really need to do ... is upgradethere is a free version of oracle 11: XEOracle Database Express Edition 11g Release 2 Downloads Install that software and database, then from the old 9i export the schema containing your dataset oracle_sid=yoursidexp system/pass full=y file=9idb.dmphttp://docs.oracle.com/cd/B10501_01/server.920/a96652/ch01.htm#1004778 import into the XE the schema you need. you will have tons of trouble with the 9ilive holds several challenges, this is one which you need to tackle ... not go around it

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